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These Cruise Lines Now Include Covid-19 Terms in Their Passenger Contracts

If you're itching to sail as soon as the cruise industry restarts, you could have even more information to absorb when you read your cruise contract, depending on the cruise line you choose.

All lines have contracts of carriage, to which every passenger is required to agree before sailing. However, Royal Caribbean International, Celebrity Cruises, Disney Cruise Line and Costa Cruises have added contract wording specifically addressing covid-19.

Why don't they just turn off all the empty cruise ships?

With nearly all the cruise ships in the world sitting idle while the cruise industry remains shutdown, why don't the cruise lines shut down cruise ships and park them somewhere?

This idea makes a lot of sense when you think about how much money cruise ships cost to keep them running, even with a skeleton crew.

Most cruise lines have their ships floating off the coast of various ports around the world, but they are all operational and ready to restart cruises if given the chance.

CDC issues strongest warning ever to avoid going on a cruise ship

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced its strongest warning yet about going on a cruise ship.

The Federal agency issued a Level 4 warning to avoid ocean and river cruises anywhere in the world due to a "very high" risk.

The warning was raised from Level 3 to Level 4, which is the highest level of warning at its disposal.  In addition, the CDC warned against anyone that has an increased risk of severe illness to avoid travel on cruise ships.

Cruise industry added $55.5 billion to U.S. economy last year

Over eight months of no cruises in North America means the U.S. economy was denied billions of dollars.

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) announced that the cruise industry pumped over $55.5 billion in economic activity in the United States in 2019, a 5.3% increase from 2018. 

The data is part of a newly released 2019 U.S. Economic Impact Analysis, which serves to quantify the important role cruise lines play in contributing to the U.S. economy.

Congress calls on CDC to bring back cruise ship ban

A United States Senator and Representative want the cruise ship ban to return because of a small cruise ship experiencing a few cases right now.

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal and Congresswoman Doris Matsui signed a letter to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ask them to bring back to the No Sail Order.

The CDC lifted the No Sail Order at the end of October, but the politicians think cruises should not be able restart yet.

Cruise stocks up more than 20% today because of great vaccine trial news

If you own cruise line stock, you are waking up to some fabulous news this morning.

Cruise line stocks are up as much as 20% in pre-market trading on Monday thanks to positive data from Coronavirus vaccine trials.

Both Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine trials showed to be more than 90% effective seven days after the second dose in preventing infection in participants with no evidence of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Pass the Hand Sanitizer: 12 Things to Know About the CDC's Conditional Sailing Requirements

After seven and a half months at a complete standstill, United States-based cruises were given the tentative go-ahead to restart when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention allowed its no-sail order to expire on October 31.

Florida Governor working with Trump on helping cruise ships restart cruises

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said he is talking to the White House about what he can do to help get cruise ships sailing again.

With the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) deciding on what it will do with the No Sail order, DeSantis is lobbying how cruises could start up.

House Subcommittee Questions White House Involvement in CDC Cruise No-Sail Order Extension

The chair of the U.S. House of Representatives' Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation subcommittee has requested information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention amid allegations that the White House interfered with the extension of the CDC's no-sail order.

Despite cruise industry shutdown, new cruise ships are still being built

We all know the story: global pandemic causes cruise lines to stop sailing, sell ships, lay off employees, borrow billions of dollars and cancel thousands of voyages. The avalanche of depressing coverage about the cruise industry in 2020 has nearly made us numb, but there's good news.

Although we might feel farther away from the ocean than ever, there are shoots of hope springing up everywhere, from a marked increase in bookings and successful sailings in Europe to the impressive list of new-build milestones that have been reached in the last two months alone.

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